Defense Spending

Ron is a really nice guy. But what do you do when your kid totally spits in your face and ignores all you’ve done and said as a decent human being and a father. Being on “the world stage” and such, I think I would disown him.

I’d like to see Rand and Marco and all the rest get a semi-auto assault rifle (since in the land of the free the government is afraid of its own people so we can’t own real machine guns) and hop on a plane, paying their own way, to wherever all this spending is needed and do it themselves.

What scum we have in the public eye presented as leaders or statesmen. Any patriotic American should be ashamed these people are not in jail.

http://time.com/3759378/rand-paul-defense-spending/

UPS brought our new book today, Hacking Your Education

It is about making your start in the world without paying a bunch of people who have never done it to teach you how to do it. But this post is about something else:

A woman has sued UPS for not giving her a cushier job because she was pregnant and not able to lift 70#.
The Supremes have ruled the case may continue. UPS may be forced to run their business the way men in ropes demand. But the weird thing is this: “MS. Young became pregnant while working at a UPS facility in Landover, MD.”

It makes no mention if she were on her lunch break, or what. Getting pregnant doesn’t seem like work to me.

Johnny A

Heck. He put this on YouTube.

It was a sad night years ago when I went to The Surf without Dawnie. She had something so important going on she wasn’t there, by my side, where she belonged…. But it was a great night to hear this gifted nerd spill it out of his guitar. Then I got a phone call from Dirk, my best friend in high school, and went outside and missed Johnny’s most popular song at the time, Little Wing (Hendrix). Had to talk to Dirk, though, another victim of the war on drugs. I don’t know if he’s alive. I’ll try to call him again today. You can assume I’m angry about people being in a position of power and respect that shut dope addicts out of society dooming them to a life of lonely struggle. This rant has nothing to do with Johnny A, just the phone call.

Get a load of this:

An end to speeding tickets

We got a camera ticket from Des Moines awhile back. If only the dystopian world of Ford had been there to protect us, we coulda saved $78. I agree with one of the commenters on this story. If only Ford would make a car that wouldn’t poke along below the speed limit, causing traffic to stop flowing.

One time we saw a trooper going 55mph in the fast lane on I-35 with the speed limit at 70 Sheesh! On drugs or what. Of course he can get all he wants for free. I wonder if there are building codes for caves in the wilderness.

http://www.computerworld.com/article/2901444/ford-to-put-brakes-on-speeding-with-new-tech.html

I’ll Be a Card Carrying Communist

By harvest time I’ll be eligible for Medicare. I should be glad because our health insurance premiums are going through the roof at the same rate as my increasing aches and pains. We let our insurance agent do the research and she says it is the best we can do. We pay higher deductibles and get less coverage. Politically, being self-employed doesn’t take advantage of the mob very well. We are hung out to dry when trying to compete with unions, corporations and various associations. There is strength in numbers.

Group health insurance plans had their beginning in the 40’s when Congress feared a post war hyper inflation similar to Germany after World War II. Using the short term thinking that is so prevalent today, they set wage and price controls. Employers couldn’t compete for good workers in any way but through offering benefits. Companies could use volume as a negotiating tool with insurance companies for the lowest rates while enjoying a 100% tax deduction.

This situation made individual insurance rare. Many self-employed people have a spouse who works outside the home merely for the health insurance; another blow to the traditional family with a parent raising children at home. This situation has evolved into the notion that a family cannot survive on one income, even though closer examination of the issue reveals a ratcheting effect of compensating for lack of a family life with unnecessary luxuries.

As I near sixty-five it reminds me of 1965, the year our blessed government instituted Medicare. In studying for this article I saw a picture of my future Medicare card. Right at the top it said “Insurance.” Medicare is not insurance any more than crop insurance is insurance. Yet, once people get comfortable with looking at a nation as family, taking your piece of the pie is no longer theft, it is your entitlement.

People under sixty-five spend a relative pittance on healthcare. The system we have now has been in place since 1965 for the vast majority of medical spending. It is socialized medicine, poorly executed. There is very little competition to control costs. So any blame for our present problems cannot be placed on free markets or “capitalism.”

Liberals who call for a single payer system as an alternative to our present system have a point. In much of the western world single payer systems are proving to be less expensive than the complicated mess we have here. (Although I found a case where amputations for diabetes complications were much higher in the U.S. than the U.K. That was presented as a negative by the simple minds at The Huffington Post. But jazz trumpeter, Clark Terry, had that procedure and it improved his life immensely for four years. Always consider the source and think long term.)

Does that mean we need to adopt those socialized systems in an effort to be more like those countries? Consider some of the good points of medicine in the United States before we do that. The whole world looks to us for breakthroughs in research. We have the shortest wait times for service. Those are products of the market oriented portion of healthcare in America.

Senator Joni Ernst promised to “repeal and replace Obamacare.” My dad said, “Conservatives worship big government the same as liberals; they just think they can do it better.” That is at the root of our poor performance in healthcare. If Mrs. Ernst had simply said to repeal Obamacare, she would be getting somewhere, but she’s only being another shill for government control in an industry that would do well without any government control at all.

It is time that we, out here in the cheap seats, see that what has been presented as two extremes on the same scale is really a modest difference in how we pass our responsibility on to others through government. The choice is not between socialized medicine and better socialized medicine. It is between socialized medicine and free market medicine.

We had something close to that before 1965. People bought insurance to control risk that would exceed normal expenses, and insurance companies would set premiums to assume that risk on an individual basis.

With group plans and The Affordable Care Act we end up ignoring individual risks (such as smoking) and insuring for unnecessary risks (such as pregnant men). One-size-fits-all only works if one size really fits all.

My youth was spent in Cold War times. We hid under our school desks to prepare for nuclear war, a good indicator of the wisdom of government. That war was claimed to be about freedom versus communism. Another thing my dad said was, “In the Soviet Union, everybody has to carry a card.”
I get my card in October.

Letter to Popular Mechanics on Field Guide to Life

The article went through one year old to over sixty. Over-simplified but short enough for quick glances. But too short to give the whole picture so…

Dear Editor,

Your “Field Guide To Life” (April 2015 Popular Mechanics) was short, fun and easy to read like a magazine should be. But in today’s dumbed down culture, consequences need to be mentioned, just like all these disclaimers that litter all our media.

On page 68 two items caught my eye. To fell a tree (before you cut) first determine how it leans and plan your escape route. And unsnapping a bra with one hand probably leads to responsibilities that few 18- to 20- year-olds are ready for.

A field guide to life could leave out all the details in your article and simply say, “Seriously consider the long term affects of your actions.”

Love, Fritz